About Maruti Patola Art

When eight decades of Family Experience and a passion for upholding the traditional values come together, it results in Maruti Patola Art. [Online shop since 1990] At marutipatolart.com we have a wide range of Silk Sarees, Arani Silk Sarees, Mysore Silk Sarees, Kanchipuram Silk Sarees, Traditional Silk Sarees, Salwars, Cotton Salwars, Fancy Sarees, Pattu Sarees, Pattu Pavadai Collection, Cotton Kurtas, Silk Kurtas, Raw Silk Kurtas, Men's Shirts, Women's bags, Women's Accessories etc. Our Site Promises To Keep You Pleased With New Products Every Time You Visit. Happy Shopping !!!

Step 1 : Design

Patola designs are visualized on graph paper.

Step 2 : Dyeing

Designs are created by tying knots on warp and weft. Cotton thread is used to tie the portion marked out in conformity with the proposed design. Tied portion remains unexposed to color. Portion that was used to absorb one color is tied again to protect while applying color on other portion. Desired design is produced with desired color combination thus by tying, untying, and dying

Step 3 : Weaving

On completion of dying process, the threads of the warp of different repeats of a pattern are put together in a sequence on the loom, so that the design becomes visible. The threads of wefts are wound on to bobbins and kept in the bamboo shuttle for weaving process. The Patola is woven on a primitive hand operated harness loom. Weaving process involves moving bamboo shuttle to and fro through warp shades. Each weft thread is thoroughly examined and matched with each part of the warp design pattern while weaving.

Step 4 : Finishing

Final product is reviewed for quality and fine tuning is carried out by weaver to ensure final and enchanting Patola.

Process Of Making Patan Patola

Warp and weft silk threads are tied separately with cotton thread on the portions already marked out in conformity with the proposed design in the fabric. This tied portion is meant to remain unexposed to the colour while dyeing. United portion which has absorbed one colour, may be tied while dyeing in another colour. Tyeing untying, retying and dyeing in different shades are the main features of this process.

Creating design by tyeing knots on warp and weft

After completion of dyeing work of warps & wefts, the threads of the warp of different repeats of a pattern are put together in a sequence on the loom, so that the design becomes visible. The threads of wefts are wound on to bobbins and kept in the bamboo shuttle for weaving process.

Dyeing Process

The patola is woven on a primitive hand operated harness loom made out of rosewood and bamboo strips. The loom lies at a slant, with the left side being lower than the right side. The bamboo shuttle is made to move to and fro through warp shades. Each weft thread is thoroughly examined and matched with each part of the warp design pattern while weaving.

Tyeing knots again after previous dyeing

The tension of the warp threads are removed by the help of needle after every time weaving of 8" to 10" of fabric. Patola weaving is a highly accurate just a positioning of warp and weft of similar colour to obtain perfect design and harmony.The process is labour intensive, time consuming and requires high order of skill and dexterity.

Traditional Patola Loom It takes three to six months to prepare tie- dyed design on warp and weft threads for one sari of 6 yards length by 46" width. Two weavers working together weave just about 8" to 9" a day. It takes 40 to 50 days to weave a sari. Thus 4 to 5 persons take a periods of 5 to 6 months to complete a sari depending on the intricacy of the design.